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Career Story: Salon Owner

Sam owns and manages a salon in Los Angeles. Hear her insights about the hairdressing industry and its financial challenges.

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My name is Sam DiVine,
I'm 27 years old,
SAM, 27
OWNER, SALON

and I am a salon owner.

So because I'm an owner
and I work behind the chair,

and I'm the manager right now,
I'm encompassing three positions.

My responsibilities on any given day
is going to be getting to the salon,
SAM’S RESPONSIBILITIES:
PREPARE SALON FOR CUSTOMERS

making sure that everything
is ready to run smoothly.

making sure that everything
is ready to run smoothly.

So making sure that
the schedule is correct,

making sure that
we're fully staffed,

taking care of any kind of absences,
anything that could possibly

make the day run less smoothly.
SCHEDULING
STAFFING

That I'm intercepting those things
and preventing them

or band-aiding the situation.

Taking care of the bills,
making sure that payroll is run
PAYING BILLS
PAYROLL

and payroll is processed.

Prepping for the taxes.

Handling any client situations
that could possibly come up.
HANDLE CLIENT SITUATIONS

Making sure our front desk
staff feels supported,

that they have everything
they need to do their job really well.

Making sure that our
stylists and colorists
SUPPORT STAFF

have everything that they
need to do their job well.

Working day in and day out
on the social media campaigns
SOCIAL MEDIA CAMPAIGNS

that we're doing.

because it's a very important part
of our industry now.

So doing those social media
posts whenever I have a break.

Working on my own clients
for a good portion of the day.
SEE CLIENTS

At the end of the day,
two days a week we run classes

for our assistant program.
RUN CLASSES

So, either myself or
one of my lead stylists

is going to be leading those classes.

So twice a month I'm teaching
the education classes

that we're having here
a couple days a week.

And then, this continuous
and endless cycle

of marketing and bringing
new business into the salon.
MARKET THE SALON

So as a salon owner
and behind the chair stylist,

I make $55,000 a year,
give or take, plus tips

when I'm on the stylist side.

In comparison to other
people in my industry,

I think it's gonna vary
based on location.

If you compare it to
the Midwest or the South

or cities that aren't as metropolitan
as, say, New York, Los Angeles,

or Dallas, for instance,

it's probably on the
median to high end,

I would imagine.

Because salons, if you look at
the entire scope of the salon industry,

it's quite vast.

You have salons that are
in the Midwest

that don't bring in a ton
of revenue every year.

To salons that are bringing
in multimillion dollar business.

So when you look at that,
there's going to be that median.

And I think in terms
of my individual salary,

I think we're gonna fall
in the median to high

for the majority of the country,
which is interesting.

A manager's gonna earn,
in Los Angeles,

anywhere from 50
to 150,000 dollars a year

as a salon manager,
depending on the level

of the salon and how big it is.

Somebody who's behind the chair
at the absolute highest.

they'll do, they do in-salon work,
they work with their clients,

they are on set,
they do a lot of photo shoots,

they're doing products.

They either have
their own product line

or they're working with
a product line that they are

the official spokesperson for.

So when you take
all of that into account,

you can take a great income
of like $100,000

and turn that into
a million-dollar income

very, very quickly.

My name is Sam DiVine,
I'm 27 years old,
SAM, 27
OWNER, SALON

and I am a salon owner.

So because I'm an owner
and I work behind the chair,

and I'm the manager right now,
I'm encompassing three positions.

My responsibilities on any given day
is going to be getting to the salon,
SAM’S RESPONSIBILITIES:
PREPARE SALON FOR CUSTOMERS

making sure that everything
is ready to run smoothly.

making sure that everything
is ready to run smoothly.

So making sure that
the schedule is correct,

making sure that
we're fully staffed,

taking care of any kind of absences,
anything that could possibly

make the day run less smoothly.
SCHEDULING
STAFFING

That I'm intercepting those things
and preventing them

or band-aiding the situation.

Taking care of the bills,
making sure that payroll is run
PAYING BILLS
PAYROLL

and payroll is processed.

Prepping for the taxes.

Handling any client situations
that could possibly come up.
HANDLE CLIENT SITUATIONS

Making sure our front desk
staff feels supported,

that they have everything
they need to do their job really well.

Making sure that our
stylists and colorists
SUPPORT STAFF

have everything that they
need to do their job well.

Working day in and day out
on the social media campaigns
SOCIAL MEDIA CAMPAIGNS

that we're doing.

because it's a very important part
of our industry now.

So doing those social media
posts whenever I have a break.

Working on my own clients
for a good portion of the day.
SEE CLIENTS

At the end of the day,
two days a week we run classes

for our assistant program.
RUN CLASSES

So, either myself or
one of my lead stylists

is going to be leading those classes.

So twice a month I'm teaching
the education classes

that we're having here
a couple days a week.

And then, this continuous
and endless cycle

of marketing and bringing
new business into the salon.
MARKET THE SALON

So as a salon owner
and behind the chair stylist,

I make $55,000 a year,
give or take, plus tips

when I'm on the stylist side.

In comparison to other
people in my industry,

I think it's gonna vary
based on location.

If you compare it to
the Midwest or the South

or cities that aren't as metropolitan
as, say, New York, Los Angeles,

or Dallas, for instance,

it's probably on the
median to high end,

I would imagine.

Because salons, if you look at
the entire scope of the salon industry,

it's quite vast.

You have salons that are
in the Midwest

that don't bring in a ton
of revenue every year.

To salons that are bringing
in multimillion dollar business.

So when you look at that,
there's going to be that median.

And I think in terms
of my individual salary,

I think we're gonna fall
in the median to high

for the majority of the country,
which is interesting.

A manager's gonna earn,
in Los Angeles,

anywhere from 50
to 150,000 dollars a year

as a salon manager,
depending on the level

of the salon and how big it is.

Somebody who's behind the chair
at the absolute highest.

they'll do, they do in-salon work,
they work with their clients,

they are on set,
they do a lot of photo shoots,

they're doing products.

They either have
their own product line

or they're working with
a product line that they are

the official spokesperson for.

So when you take
all of that into account,

you can take a great income
of like $100,000

and turn that into
a million-dollar income

very, very quickly.