What Americans eat

Accessibility to locally grown food and advancements in growing have affected not just how we eat, but what we can afford. In these clips, the expert panel debates the nutrition opportunities for all economic backgrounds, the real issue with GMOs and how the industrialization of food affects both your wallet and health.

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FEMALE: A hundred years ago people spent 40 percent of their income on food. Even 50 years ago, it was something like 30 percent. Today it's 10 percent. 

MALE: Which people?

FEMALE: American people. 

MALE: Okay.

FEMALE: And that is absolutely a triumph of industrial agriculture. It’s absolutely a triumph of the industrial retail system. Overall, freeing up 40 percent of people’s income to do other stuff is a moral triumph.

MALE: Let’s be real here for a second.

FEMALE: Oh we’re starting that now?

MALE: Yeah, we’re starting right away. We’re starting reality.

HOST: First number.

MALE: This is fiction, it’s fiction that’s coming from your mouth. If you don’t have a lot of money to spend on food, it actually might be a pretty smart choice to spend your five dollars a day that you get to put on food, to get as many calories as possible into your body.

FEMALE: A hundred years ago people spent 40 percent of their income on food. Even 50 years ago, it was something like 30 percent. Today it's 10 percent. 

MALE: Which people?

FEMALE: American people. 

MALE: Okay.

FEMALE: And that is absolutely a triumph of industrial agriculture. It’s absolutely a triumph of the industrial retail system. Overall, freeing up 40 percent of people’s income to do other stuff is a moral triumph.