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The effect of time on your retirement account

Time has the potential to benefit the growth of your savings and retirement accounts. See how starting early could have a big impact on your financial future.

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The material provided on this website is for informational use only and is not intended for financial, tax or investment advice. Bank of America and/or its affiliates, and Khan Academy, assume no liability for any loss or damage resulting from one’s reliance on the material provided. Please also note that such material is not updated regularly and that some of the information may not therefore be current. Consult with your own financial professional and tax advisor when making decisions regarding your financial situation.

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[Visual of “The effect of time on your retirement account”]

[Visual disclaimer: See important information at the end of this video.]

When you’re young, you’re in one of the best positions you’ll ever be in to start planning for retirement.

It might seem strange to think about retiring from a career you’ve probably just started, but setting aside even a small amount of money in a retirement account now,

[Visual of a $10 contribution to a retirement account]

can have a big impact on your savings several decades down the line.

That’s because time can be your best ally when it comes to investing for retirement.

Let’s take a look at what happens if you start investing just a small amount for your retirement in your early twenties, say, ten dollars a week

[Visual of $10 a week multiplied by 10 years]

over the course of ten years in a tax deferred retirement investment account, like a traditional 401(k) or IRA. Now, when we say tax deferred, that means you’d pay taxes later, generally in retirement.

And, for example, a contribution to a traditional IRA could be eligible for a tax deduction, depending on your income and whether you are participating in an employer plan.

In any case, let’s say that these hypothetical investments grow at a rate of 7% per year. Now, 7% has historically been a pretty decent return on investments over long periods, but it certainly isn’t guaranteed.

There could be years where your investments perform really well, and the return is even higher.

[Visual of a Line graph shoes arrow going up with 18% growth]

And there could be years when your investments don’t do as well, and you actually lose money.

[Visual of a Line graph going down showing a loss of 18%]

Unlike a deposit account at a bank, an investment account is not FDIC insured and is not bank guaranteed. But for the sake of this hypothetical example, let’s say that your money does grow at an average constant rate of 7% per year.

Setting aside ten dollars a week, every week for ten years, adds up to $5,200 of principal.

But over the course of this time, if your investments have had the opportunity to grow at a rate of 7% each year, that could come out to a total of about $7,700. So that would be an extra $2,500 that you could theoretically earn in your first ten years of making steady contributions of ten dollars a week.

[Visual Disclaimer: *This is for hypothetical illustration only]

Now, you might think that isn’t much after ten years, and hey, you can use that money to save for an awesome vacation instead. But let’s take a look at what happens to that $7,700 over the next ten years.

[Visual of graph appears starting off with $7,700]

Even without contributing any more money to your account, which you’d hopefully still be doing, at a 7% annual rate of return, that $7,700 could grow into about $15,150. And over twenty years, about $29,800. And after thirty years, which could be around the time you start thinking about retiring, it might’ve grown to about $58,600.

[Visual Disclaimer: *This is a hypothetical example for illustration purposes only]

$58,600 is a substantial amount that could come from an initial investment of just ten dollars a week for ten years.

That’s $53,400 that was earned off of an initial investment of $5,200 in this scenario.

Now of course, this example is hypothetical.

It doesn’t take into account inflation, which will also have a substantial effect on the value of your funds over time.

[Visual of inflation taking a substantial portion of value off of the hypothetical increase in value]

And there’s no guarantee that you can get a 7% return. And in a tax deferred account like a traditional 401(k), you’ll need to pay taxes on what you withdraw when you retire.

There may also be expenses associated with your investment account.

As well as expenses and fees associated with individual investments.

[Visual of account fees and individual investment fees taking a portion of value off of the hypothetical increase in value]

And all of these things can have an impact on the performance of your account over time.

[Inflation, taxes and fees are represented]

To learn more about your particular account, you can speak to an investment professional. But getting back to our example:

Over time, these investments have had the opportunity to grow, and in addition to that growth, any money you might earn from your investments, when reinvested, can provide the potential to earn even more.

While it’s never too late to start contributing toward retirement, setting aside just a few extra dollars now can give your retirement plan a great start.

End card:

Better Money Habits®
Powered by Bank of America

BetterMoneyHabits.com
The material provided on this video is for informational use only and is not intended for financial or investment advice.

Bank of America Corporation and/or its affiliates assume no liability for any loss or damages resulting from one’s reliance on the material provided. Please also note that such material is not updated regularly and that some of the information may not therefore be current. Consult with your own financial professional when making decisions regarding your financial or investment management.

Neither Bank of America Corporation nor its affiliates are tax or legal advisors. We suggest you consult your personal tax or legal advisor before making tax or legal-related investment decisions.

Merrill Edge® is available through Merrill Lynch, Pierce Fenner & Smith Incorporated (MLPF&S), and consists of the Merrill Edge Advisory Center (investment guidance) and self-directed online investing.

Banking products are provided by Bank of America, N.A. and affiliated banks, Members FDIC and wholly owned subsidiaries of Bank of America Corporation.

Investment products:
Are Not FDIC Insured
Are Not Bank Guaranteed
May Lose Value

Investment products are available through MLPF&S, a registered broker-dealer, Member SIPC and wholly owned subsidiary of Bank of America Corporation. ©2019 Bank of America Corporation.

[Visual of “The effect of time on your retirement account”]

[Visual disclaimer: See important information at the end of this video.]

When you’re young, you’re in one of the best positions you’ll ever be in to start planning for retirement.

It might seem strange to think about retiring from a career you’ve probably just started, but setting aside even a small amount of money in a retirement account now,

[Visual of a $10 contribution to a retirement account]

can have a big impact on your savings several decades down the line.

That’s because time can be your best ally when it comes to investing for retirement.

Let’s take a look at what happens if you start investing just a small amount for your retirement in your early twenties, say, ten dollars a week

[Visual of $10 a week multiplied by 10 years]

over the course of ten years in a tax deferred retirement investment account, like a traditional 401(k) or IRA. Now, when we say tax deferred, that means you’d pay taxes later, generally in retirement.

And, for example, a contribution to a traditional IRA could be eligible for a tax deduction, depending on your income and whether you are participating in an employer plan.

In any case, let’s say that these hypothetical investments grow at a rate of 7% per year. Now, 7% has historically been a pretty decent return on investments over long periods, but it certainly isn’t guaranteed.

There could be years where your investments perform really well, and the return is even higher.

[Visual of a Line graph shoes arrow going up with 18% growth]

And there could be years when your investments don’t do as well, and you actually lose money.

[Visual of a Line graph going down showing a loss of 18%]

Unlike a deposit account at a bank, an investment account is not FDIC insured and is not bank guaranteed. But for the sake of this hypothetical example, let’s say that your money does grow at an average constant rate of 7% per year.

Setting aside ten dollars a week, every week for ten years, adds up to $5,200 of principal.

But over the course of this time, if your investments have had the opportunity to grow at a rate of 7% each year, that could come out to a total of about $7,700. So that would be an extra $2,500 that you could theoretically earn in your first ten years of making steady contributions of ten dollars a week.

[Visual Disclaimer: *This is for hypothetical illustration only]

Now, you might think that isn’t much after ten years, and hey, you can use that money to save for an awesome vacation instead. But let’s take a look at what happens to that $7,700 over the next ten years.

[Visual of graph appears starting off with $7,700]

Even without contributing any more money to your account, which you’d hopefully still be doing, at a 7% annual rate of return, that $7,700 could grow into about $15,150. And over twenty years, about $29,800. And after thirty years, which could be around the time you start thinking about retiring, it might’ve grown to about $58,600.

[Visual Disclaimer: *This is a hypothetical example for illustration purposes only]

$58,600 is a substantial amount that could come from an initial investment of just ten dollars a week for ten years.

That’s $53,400 that was earned off of an initial investment of $5,200 in this scenario.

Now of course, this example is hypothetical.

It doesn’t take into account inflation, which will also have a substantial effect on the value of your funds over time.

[Visual of inflation taking a substantial portion of value off of the hypothetical increase in value]

And there’s no guarantee that you can get a 7% return. And in a tax deferred account like a traditional 401(k), you’ll need to pay taxes on what you withdraw when you retire.

There may also be expenses associated with your investment account.

As well as expenses and fees associated with individual investments.

[Visual of account fees and individual investment fees taking a portion of value off of the hypothetical increase in value]

And all of these things can have an impact on the performance of your account over time.

[Inflation, taxes and fees are represented]

To learn more about your particular account, you can speak to an investment professional. But getting back to our example:

Over time, these investments have had the opportunity to grow, and in addition to that growth, any money you might earn from your investments, when reinvested, can provide the potential to earn even more.

While it’s never too late to start contributing toward retirement, setting aside just a few extra dollars now can give your retirement plan a great start.

End card:

Better Money Habits®
Powered by Bank of America

BetterMoneyHabits.com
The material provided on this video is for informational use only and is not intended for financial or investment advice.

Bank of America Corporation and/or its affiliates assume no liability for any loss or damages resulting from one’s reliance on the material provided. Please also note that such material is not updated regularly and that some of the information may not therefore be current. Consult with your own financial professional when making decisions regarding your financial or investment management.

Neither Bank of America Corporation nor its affiliates are tax or legal advisors. We suggest you consult your personal tax or legal advisor before making tax or legal-related investment decisions.

Merrill Edge® is available through Merrill Lynch, Pierce Fenner & Smith Incorporated (MLPF&S), and consists of the Merrill Edge Advisory Center (investment guidance) and self-directed online investing.

Banking products are provided by Bank of America, N.A. and affiliated banks, Members FDIC and wholly owned subsidiaries of Bank of America Corporation.

Investment products:
Are Not FDIC Insured
Are Not Bank Guaranteed
May Lose Value

Investment products are available through MLPF&S, a registered broker-dealer, Member SIPC and wholly owned subsidiary of Bank of America Corporation. ©2019 Bank of America Corporation.

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Investment products:

Are Not

FDIC Insured

Are Not

Bank Guaranteed

May Lose Value

Bank of America and its affiliates do not provide legal, tax or accounting advice. You should consult your legal and/or tax advisors before making any financial decisions.