The end of Hollywood

Online streaming offers a cheaper, more convenient way to consume video, and new technology has made filmmaking and distribution easier than ever for those outside Hollywood. What does this mean for the film industry? Find out in these clips.

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The essence of the show being business, there’s always a bottom line. For me, my bottom line is being priced out in going to the theater. I will only go pay if it is that ride that I can’t get waiting for Redbox, waiting for Netflix.

My question to you is: In terms of when you’re looking at a script, or we’ve talked about the tent-poles, and we’ve talked about the media market, where do you see the actual theater business and those bigger dramatic rides go in your creative process when you’re looking at a film?

I think your tendencies are what a lot of people feel as ticket prices go up and as the options become more convenient at home. You have to make choices, and you’re only going to go if it’s really something special, and with social media now you can’t get away with producing a bomb or a crappy movie and just putting it in theaters and fooling people with marketing. People are looking on Twitter and Rotten Tomatoes and everywhere that first opening night, and if their friends are Tweeting that it sucks. It probably sucks and you’re not going to go see it.

One of the major games came out the same weekend that a film that was targeting a younger male demographic, and I forget what film that was, but it underperformed that weekend and some people said the game probably took some audience away from that.

I could see that easily. I could see that, but yeah I think ultimately you’re going to play your game, but I think ultimately you are going to want to turn something on and just be a passive viewer.

And I want to say one thing, financially, and I’m shocked about the number. I didn’t even know a video game cost $60. Let’s say if it costs $60 and going to the movie costs $16, or whatever. I mean you’re going to have to make a decision if the parents say, “That’s $60. You’re not going to the movies for at least a month.”

I’m sure it’s affecting us. We don’t want to believe it, but I have to believe it affects us.
The essence of the show being business, there’s always a bottom line. For me, my bottom line is being priced out in going to the theater. I will only go pay if it is that ride that I can’t get waiting for Redbox, waiting for Netflix.

My question to you is: In terms of when you’re looking at a script, or we’ve talked about the tent-poles, and we’ve talked about the media market, where do you see the actual theater business and those bigger dramatic rides go in your creative process when you’re looking at a film?

I think your tendencies are what a lot of people feel as ticket prices go up and as the options become more convenient at home. You have to make choices, and you’re only going to go if it’s really something special, and with social media now you can’t get away with producing a bomb or a crappy movie and just putting it in theaters and fooling people with marketing. People are looking on Twitter and Rotten Tomatoes and everywhere that first opening night, and if their friends are Tweeting that it sucks. It probably sucks and you’re not going to go see it.